SW Portland Martial Arts Blog

College Student Special

August 30th, 2017

Our Fall martial arts special: $30 to train through Halloween for all full time college students.

Sign up now, pay $30 and train as much as you want in our adult martial arts classes starting today and lasting until October 31st. This offer is valid only for new students only and only for our martial arts program, not our CrossFit program.

 

Fall Student Special
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How Much Weight Should You Put on the Bar?

August 23rd, 2017

Some of you have, no doubt, been to gyms where they post the “prescribed” weight for a workout on the whiteboard. Others of you maybe remember long ago when I used to post weights alongside the workout. This leads us to three great questions: Why did I stop posting weights? Why do other gyms post weights? If there is no weight listed, how much should you do?
I stopped posting weights because some people would do the posted weights with atrocious form. Others would do the posted weights with passable form but take forever to finish, essentially getting a strength workout when I intended to give them a conditioning workout. And finally, a few folks would do the posted weights and it was too easy. The takeaway for me was: people need to find a weight that they can do with decent form, that allows them to get a conditioning workout, and that delivers a decent challenge for them.
Other gyms post weights because… no two CrossFit gyms need to be the same. One gym’s awesome culture is another gym’s nightmare culture.
As a general rule, if there are 21 or less reps of something in a workout, you should pick a weight that you can do unbroken (at least for the first round, if there is more than one round). This is a rule with MANY exceptions but it is a pretty good starting place. If you’re not sure what weight you should use, try asking the coach what the INTENT of the workout is. Is the intent to test your strength? Then go heavy. Is the intent to push your technique? Then pick a weight that you can maintain good technique with. Ask questions and discover the purpose behind the workout which will hopefully lead you to an appropriate weight.
As a final note, if you are not very competent with the movement, the weight you should use is A DIFFERENT MOVEMENT. Don’t do motions you don’t have at least a moderate technical grasp on during the conditioning section – you’ll just burn in crummy technique. Do something else. Ask your coach for a substitute movement.

Swag

August 4th, 2017

Finally, you can get our school logo or our monk mascot plastered on pretty much any kind of t-shirt you want. You can also get our awesome logo on a coffee mug, baby onesie, or computer case, and lots of other random objects.

Head on over to our new TeePublic store to check it out.

Friday Kid’s Class

July 17th, 2017


We now have a Friday kid’s class, which means we now have kid’s classes 7 days a week! On top of that, the new class is another BJJ class so those students who couldn’t make it to Monday now have another opportunity to hone their ground skills and those students who want more time on the mats rolling… Friday is another guaranteed wrestling day.

In addition, Tyme (the coach who is leading the Friday class) and I are hoping that having two classes a week in BJJ is going to inspire some of the kids to get a Gi and wear a belt so we can start giving out BJJ rank to the students.

New Boxing Class

June 30th, 2017

We are excited to add a new piece to our adult martial arts program – boxing! The class will be held every Monday and Wednesday from 10am-11am. Since it is part of our martial arts program, students who are paying dues for martial arts are welcome to attend at no extra charge and for all those who sign up in the future – it is all part of our increasingly awesome programming.

The coach, Sasha Dadvar, has offered up the following summary of the class:

* Development of general fitness should be a priority for the beginner boxer, regardless of age and experience.

* In this particular stage, it is also important to develop coordination and speed.

* Each training session should be planned accordingly to teach and train both physical and technical elements

* Always start the teaching from simple tasks to complex tasks; the more complex the tasks, the easier it is to lose the attention and interest of the boxer.

* Should incorporate different games for training sessions to create an enjoyable training environment

So the way I read that description, it sounds like we are going to: sweat, develop the physical attributes of coordination and speed, be led through a carefully planned curriculum, be taught tasks appropriate to our skill level, and play some games that probably involve punching each other.

Awesome!